A Long House

an exhibition by Outpost Office

A Long House

by Outpost Office

Text and images by Outpost Office

A Long House is a proposal for collective housing.


The legal, economic and political preservation of the American single-family home hinders and stifles the imagination of alternatives. This exhibition endorses recent efforts to reevaluate the hegemony of the single-family home in America with a concrete architectural proposal for attached and semi-attached housing that sidesteps assumptions of inhabitants' lifestyles or kinship structures. As architects and citizens, we believe our built environment can and should embrace the ambiguous messiness and enigmatic fluidity of our social interdependence.

A Long House is not a discrete building design; it is a flexible prototype, a spatial product for densifying, particularly in suburban and exurban locales. The building's meandering form can adapt to the various proportions of incongruous parcels and plots. Its geometry softens notions of inside and outside as its spine ricochets across a site, creating a crumpled typology punctuated by courtyards, nooks, and crannies.




Long House Site Studies
Upper + Lower Plan
Physics Simulation 1
Physics Simulation 2
Section Drawing
A Long House offers a collection of semi-detached ground floor units organized by modules for storage and service. This alternating pattern of open and closed spaces provides a flexible framework for delineating dwelling units of variable sizes, programs, and profiles. The service cabinets ensure that the exterior massing does not reflect the interior configuration, defying conventional registration of ownership and separation that characterizes modern attached housing. The upper level amplifies the spatial entanglement and connections between units with large open spaces for shared resources such as home-offices and childcare spaces. The prototype's constructive ambiguity provides for idiosyncratic spatial affordances within a highly articulated geometry. The use or program of communal space is not specified but coordinated through localized agonism and negotiation.

The dominant architectural gesture of A Long House is its continuous, undulating roof. The roof houses the aforementioned shared spaces above and generous communal porches below. The exaggerated gable provides pragmatic shelter but predominantly serves as a unifying image for A Long House, drawing together the entire complex and ensuring the community lives both literally and figuratively under one roof.
Photos: Stephan Takacs
The centerpiece of this exhibition is a set of two large prototype models. Each model is a flat-packed, ready-to-assemble kit for easy transport and rapid assembly. The models are composed of ubiquitous low-grade residential construction materials like OSB panels and aluminum struts. An applied graphic of fluorescent, high visibility yellow accents the model, bringing vibrance and life to a subdued and muted palette of greys, tans, and beiges.



Long House Parts & Assembled Model

Photo: Stephen Takacs

Long House

The App


A Long House is not a discrete housing proposal, but a spatial product for introducing collective housing in a variety of contexts. Gallery visitors are encouraged to experiment with this app to fold and crumple their own Long House proposals. Begin by adding fold lines, then select "Fold It" to generate the form. The app is compatible with touch interfaces, but works best with mouse input.

View at Outpost Office ︎︎︎




Outpost Office would like to thank The Knowlton School and Wedge Gallery for financial support for this exhibition.

Special thanks to Tyler Young, who assisted with model development and Oliver Popadich, our frequent collaborator who developed the app. Thanks also to Marwan Al Awadhi, Nathan Fleeger, Caroline Kerka, Tristan Kercher, Eleanor Lewis and Trey Marshall.

Long House

The App


A Long House is not a discrete housing proposal, but a spatial product for introducing collective housing in a variety of contexts. Gallery visitors are encouraged to experiment with this app to fold and crumple their own Long House proposals. Begin by adding fold lines, then select "Fold It" to generate the form. The app is compatible with touch interfaces, but works best with mouse input.

View at Outpost Office ︎︎︎


Outpost Office would like to thank The Knowlton School and Wedge Gallery for financial support for this exhibition.

Special thanks to Tyler Young, who assisted with model development and Oliver Popadich, our frequent collaborator who developed the app. Thanks also to Marwan Al Awadhi, Nathan Fleeger, Caroline Kerka, Tristan Kercher, Eleanor Lewis and Trey Marshall.

Wedge Gallery

©2021 Woodbury School of Architecture
Website design and show identity by Robyn Baker
©2021 Woodbury School of Architecture
Website and show identity by Robyn Baker